Full-time counselors are on campus and here to help

Letter to the editor

Full-time licensed professional counselors (LPCs) have been part of the WCC landscape for many years and have a multifaceted skill set providing counseling services to students on a regular basis. All LPCs in Counseling and Career Planning, the Student Resource & Women’s Center and divisional counselors strive to provide the very best wellness care, assisting students to meet their academic needs.

Since 1988, LPCs have been recognized in the state of Michigan as mental health clinicians through the counselor licensure law and are regulated by federal and state laws that define our scope of practice. At WCC we are also trained in confidential reporting, participate in Psychological Emergency Procedure (PEP or At-Risk Team) assisting students in crisis, and we will play a primary role in the upcoming Behavioral Intervention Team.

All counselors at WCC are committed to assisting students in achieving academic and personal success. We understand that life gets complicated at times and various issues can impact students’ academic success. Full-time WCC counselors are available to meet with students on an individual basis to provide personal counseling services for a variety of concerns. From time to time, counselors make appropriate community referrals to best suit student needs.

 

Mission of the college

Our college strives to make a positive difference in people’s lives through accessible and excellent educational programs and services.

  • We provide a caring, open-door teaching and learning environment.
  • We provide excellent teaching, counseling and support services.
  • We reach out to people who have limited income or other barriers to success.
  • We enable people to progress in their academic and career pursuits.
  • We work in partnership with the communities we serve.

 

We are all in support of the college’s mission statement. We attempt to serve our students using the outlying principles listed above. We hope that your academic semester is off to a good start. Please know that we are here to support you.

 

Pat Taylor, LPC, dean of support services and student advocacy
John Rinke, LPC, director of student support services
Debra Guerrero, LPC, director of learning support  services
Liz Orbits, LPC, manager of the Student Resource & Women’s Center and International Student Center
Kim Groce, LPC, divisional counselor
Sue Travis, LPC, divisional counselor
Jim Bauer, LPC, counselor

 

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No Parking…

No Parking…

Letter to the editor
Over the years, Washtenaw Community College has often demonstrated an ability to discover innovative solutions to a variety of challenges. Unfortunately, the chosen solution to the parking situation shows a significant lack of such innovative thinking. The parking structure may indeed alleviate the current parking shortage. However, at a time when the college is warning of declining revenues, committing the college to a project that will cost over $20 million appears to be poor stewardship. It is also an environmentally insensitive solution to the parking limitation. The benefits of “going up” to reduce the area to be paved was totally lost by the decision to add the new connecting road between lots one and seven. As a result, over 1000 trees are being destroyed and a natural area that was under development will be covered by asphalt. This, along with the lack of attention to developing transportation alternatives, would seem to contradict the American College and University President’s Climate Commitment. There have been numerous suggestions made concerning how the college could accommodate additional cars. These have included moving some of the traffic islands and the re-striping of the parking lots to reduce wasted space. Combined with stripping 20 percent of the spaces as “compact parking,” this could create over half of the spaces that the parking structure would provide at a fraction of the cost. Additional ideas such as designing some road shoulders to handle overflow parking, planning for some overflow parking on lawn areas by the placement of reinforcing grids to protect the sod, and balancing class schedules to spread out the peak times would have been far more cost effective than the $1,000,000 a year cost of the parking structure. Instead, the college has become more vigorous in blocking areas that have been used as overflow areas in the past. This includes preventing some road shoulder parking, blocking all lawn parking and preventing access to the southwest service road, which had previously been marked for diagonal parking. In addition, access to the 115-space athletic field lot was restricted throughout September. Some people have observed that it appeared almost as if WCC was trying to intensify the problem to reduce any opposition to the building of a parking structure. For over forty years, Washtenaw Community College has provided, and continues to provide, a tremendous service to the residents of Washtenaw County (and beyond) by providing high quality programs at very affordable costs. It has done this, in part, by “thinking outside the box” and often demonstrating amazingly effective stewardship of its resources. It is unfortunate that, in this one area, the ability to be creative seems to be missing. Regards Phil Geyer WCC Instructor, Business and Computer Technology Former WCC student

Smells like…

Smells like…

Letter to the editor
I arrived on campus this morning, Nov. 16, only to be greeted, yet again, by the foul stench of sewer gas. I’m trying to work in the library, but the odor is so overpowering, and wrong, that I can barely take a breath, let alone concentrate. I know I run the risk of sounding like a complainer trying to get out of doing something, but quite the contrary; I am a straight-A student, a hard worker and I enjoy learning. I now have a headache and a not-so-funny taste in my mouth. I am barely breathing as my body, knowing it’s being poisoned, is refusing to draw air in it’s own silent protest. This stuff is bad, and bad for you, yet we are forced to sit in it and breath it in all day waiting, hoping and possibly even praying that the “wind” will change. I’m here to tell you the winds haven’t changed in years! It seems that nobody, of importance that is, cares about this. I know you guys ran an excellent article on this last spring and I was a bit relieved because I thought, “Hey, maybe they’re finally gonna do something about this.” But here we are, six months later, and the status quo has been maintained. Nothing, in regards to the offensive smell, has changed. I’m here four, sometimes five, days a week and so is that horrendous smell. I don’t care about having to park six miles away. I don’t care about the surprise quiz in my programming class. I care about having fresh air to breath! I know there are others that feel this way, but I don’t know what we can do. The only thing I know how to do at this point is speak with my money. I have been a member at the fitness center since they opened their doors, which is a beautiful facility that I love working out at when it doesn’t reek inside. I will not renew my membership because of the sewer stench. Maybe if enough businesses start losing money over the smell (which unfortunately seems to be the only way to get things done around here), people will actually stand up and start fighting for their right to clean air. I mean how do they expect us to learn, grow and be fit with our heads constantly aching and our mouths full of the taste of…well, you know! Maybe it’s time to get organized, perhaps launch a new student group for the banning of befouling our breathable air. Maybe it’s time for The Voice to run another article, this time listing contact numbers, e-mails and addresses of the people we need to get a hold of to remedy this situation. It is definitely time for something to be done about this! Tired of smelling like I s#@! and slipped in it, Ryan “Moses” Murawski Ann Arbor

Letter to the editor

Letter to the editor

To the Editor: I’m writing in response to Managing Editor Matt Thompson’s article entitled WCC considers privatizing part-time workers. More than half of the professors at Washtenaw Community College are part time, some having worked many years under this status. I myself worked as a laboratory technician at WCC twelve years ago. Each semester I had to sign a statement, written by the college, saying I agreed that, if I worked twenty or more hours a week, I would be fired. The reason the college makes part-time workers sign this statement is that the college does not want to pay benefits to part-time staff. WCC President Larry Whitworth’s statement that “few part timers are able to see that retirement money” is not correct. I myself received a letter from the state of Michigan last year informing me that I will receive the retirement money that was taken out of my paychecks once I reach 70 and a half, the age at which the elderly are required to start taking a certain percentage yearly from their traditional IRA savings. All workers deserve the chance of acquiring a retirement fund. All workers deserve a modicum of security regarding the income they receive for their work; this is more likely when one is paid by the institution where one works. Working under an outside, for-profit company makes the worker a temporary employee. As a taxpayer in Washtenaw County, I would not want half of the faculty at my local two-year college to be temporary employees. This is especially unfair when many of these faculty are teaching at the same college for many years. I wonder what the citizens of Washtenaw County would think if more than half the professors teaching their children worked under a private, for-profit company instead of under public scrutiny? We do know of some of the abuses that have occurred, when public functions have been given into private hands. For instance, in the field of “child corrections,” many children have lost their rights, and some even their lives, when boarded under for-profit companies, with very little public oversight. Washtenaw Community College has been a beacon of hope for generations of local students. I myself have attended WCC off-and-on for a quarter of a century. Most of the great teachers I’ve been privileged to study under have been part-time professors. Instead of trying to balance the WCC budget on the backs of half of its faculty, these hard-working public servants deserve access to health insurance and a much greater transparency so that they and their students will know whether they will be hired back for succeeding semesters. Ask your Board of Trustees if they are going to treat our professors with the respect that all workers deserve. Judy Bonnell-Wenzel Ann Arbor